The February LSAT: Why it’s Good, Why it’s Bad, Why it’s Not as Ugly as you May Think

Cory Ferreira —  February 1, 2012 — 1 Comment

I know what you’re thinking: aren’t all LSATs a pain in the neck? Touche – you got me there – but the February LSAT can be a particularly baffling proposition for law school hopefuls. There are several reasons for this…

Reason #1 – It is an ‘Undisclosed’ Test

The main reason the February LSAT is a bit more frustrating than its June, October, and December brethren is that it is the only LSAT given that is completely ‘undisclosed’. When an LSAT is ‘undisclosed’, it means that the only thing you’ll get back in terms of results from LSAC is your score out of 180, and your percentile. You will not know how many questions you got wrong, or which questions you got wrong. For obvious reasons, this is super annoying!

February: The Ugly Duckling of LSAT Administrations

So why would LSAC do this to you? According to LSAC, they need to keep some  of their content under lock and key in case they ever need to administer an emergency LSAT due to any number of unforeseen circumstances (i.e. inclement weather). Keeping the February LSAT undisclosed allows them to have a ‘reserve’ stash of LSAT content that could be used in a pinch.

Reason #2 – Lousy Timing

Another knock against the February LSAT is the timing of it; Since law schools use a rolling admissions process that begins in January and typically wraps up early in the new year, February LSAT scores are too late to use to gain admission in fall of that same year. In other words, February 2012 LSAT takers are unlikely to be permitted to use those scores to gain entry to Law School in September of 2012. I say ‘generally’ because there are some rare exceptions to this, however they are just that: exceptions. You should strive to have your applications completed by the end of the calendar year.

Reason #3 – It has a Horrid Reputation

There is a general attitude of contempt for the February LSAT, which I’m betting has just about everything to do with reasons 1 and 2 above. I’ve even heard people take the besmirching of the February LSAT so far as to claim that it is the “hardest” of all the LSATs given in a calendar year. Let’s be perfectly clear about this: the February LSAT IS NOT HARDER than any other LSAT given.

Certainly the fact that it is undisclosed makes it less appealing, however there is absolutely no data to suggest that it is in any way more difficult than any other LSAT test.

I could repeat those last two sentences until I’m blue in the face, and folks would still start vicious internet rumors about how the February LSAT is 100x more difficult than the others. This is plainly false, although I’m sure the inability of individuals to see which questions they slipped up on adds to the mystique of the vicious “February LSAT is harder than others” rumor. In the interest of painstaking, mind numbing clarity: it is NOT harder than any other implementation of the LSAT.

So why would anyone in their right mind actually take the LSAT in February?

Glad you asked! There are many good reasons to take the LSAT in February, particularly if you’ve planned ahead and are taking your LSAT well ahead of your application deadline. If your best opportunity to study was over the Fall/early Winter, the February LSAT likely makes sense for you.

At the end of the day,  “when” you should take your LSAT comes  down to this: when can you do your very best on it? The answer to that question unsurprisingly will correlate to when you have the most time to prepare. Happystudying

Cory Ferreira

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Cory Ferreira is the head of Marketing for Manhattan LSAT. He graduated from Syracuse University with a triple major in Communications, Marketing and Writing. When he’s not talking to pre law students about their post graduate dreams, Cory enjoys watching and playing sports, trying to master his guitar skills, and meeting new people.

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  1. 2014 Law School Application Season: A Comprehensive Timeline - October 31, 2014

    […] Notice I didn’t say February. If you plan to apply to start in 2015, do not plan to take the February LSAT exam because (1) some schools don’t take it, and (2) even for the schools that do, you’ll be […]

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