Logic Creep

Cory Ferreira —  August 11, 2011 — Leave a comment

"...that's the flaw in your argument! Stop assuming one path of causation when multiple paths are possible! God!"

Have you noticed that your every day interactions are effected by your LSAT prep? Consider the following example:

Civilian: You’re an hour late, you seem drunk, and you forgot about our date. You !@#$ idiot.

LSAT Student: Darling, in order to draw that conclusion it’s necessary that you assume that I’m not late because I was building up the courage to tell you that I love you. And there is the flaw in your argument – it’s a classic case of concluding a certain explanation when many others would have sufficed.

One byproduct of a healthy dose of LSAT prep is the application of formal logic to one’s every day, non-LSAT-prep-related- life. You may not even realize this is happening at first, but trust me – this is a very real phenomenon and it will drive the people in your life bananas!

Since this is such an important issue – I mean let’s face it, it’s imperative that you preserve what is left of your social life– I have taken it upon myself to diagnose and (attempt to) treat this epidemic afflicting LSAT’ers everywhere.

My official diagnosis is ‘Logic Creep’ (every worthy affliction needs a label). Aside from doubling as the name all of your friends and family are calling you behind your back, it’s short and to the point.

So how can you get yourself to stop analyzing arguments in your personal life in terms of premises, conclusions, supporting principles, and assumptions? My advice is simple: don’t stop!

If you’ve trained your mind to scrutinize the logic of every argument you’re faced with in order to determine what assumptions it relies on and how certain evidence justifies or supports the argument, I’d say you’re heading for success in logical reasoning come test day.

However, if logic creep continues to be a problem in your personal relationships, try hitting them with a dose of their own medicine:

LSAT Student: “Your continued protests of my logical approach to our discourse is going to hinder my progress in getting a great LSAT score and you know how important that is to me. You must not love me!”

Cory Ferreira

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Cory Ferreira is the head of Marketing for Manhattan LSAT. He graduated from Syracuse University with a triple major in Communications, Marketing and Writing. When he’s not talking to pre law students about their post graduate dreams, Cory enjoys watching and playing sports, trying to master his guitar skills, and meeting new people.

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